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  • Understanding Embodiment Through Lived Religion: A Look at Vernacular Physiologies in an Old Norse Milieu

    Frog

    Chapter from the book: Wikström af Edholm, K et al. 2019. Myth, Materiality and Lived Religion: In Merovingian and Viking Scandinavia.

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    This chapter outlines an approach to how ritual technologies prominent for a person can impact on the development of that person’s body image – i.e. a symbolic and iconic model of what our body is (and is not). Three types of ritual specialists from the Old Norse milieu are explored: berserkir, vǫlur and what are here described as deep-trance specialists. It is argued that all three were likely conceived as having distinct body images linked to the respective ritual technologies that they used. Bringing into focus the relationship between the technology of practice and body image interfaced with it offers insights into how their technologies were imagined to “work”, and also the degree to which they aligned with or diverged from the normative body image identified with non-specialists in society.

    A response to the chapter has been submitted by Margaret Clunies Ross.

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    How to cite this chapter
    Frog, . 2019. Understanding Embodiment Through Lived Religion: A Look at Vernacular Physiologies in an Old Norse Milieu. In: Wikström af Edholm, K et al, Myth, Materiality and Lived Religion. Stockholm: Stockholm University Press. DOI: https://doi.org/10.16993/bay.j
    License

    This is an Open Access chapter distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license (unless stated otherwise), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Copyright is retained by the author(s).

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    This book has been peer reviewed. See our Peer Review Policies for more information.

    Additional Information

    Published on June 3, 2019

    DOI
    https://doi.org/10.16993/bay.j


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